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Mauritius
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Mauritius

Mauritius, a sparkling crystal in the turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean, will fascinate you. The contrast of colours, cultures and tastes makes the island so charming that the scene is set for an unforgettable holiday relaxing on a hammock. Here, you have the opportunity to experience unparalleled luxury: a level of refinement that is head and shoulders above that on offer in other tropical holiday destinations. Here, you will discover the true meaning of ‘beauty’ – a realisation that will compel you to return to Mauritius’ shores time and again. Mauritius was named after Dutch Prince Maurice Van Nassau.

The island, with a surface area of 2,040 square kilometres, is located 20º south of the equator and 57.5º east. English is the official language, although French and Creole are commonly used. With a population of 1.2 million, the literacy rate hovers around 90%.

The northern coast of the island is the place where the most development has taken place in recent years. Thanks to this work, Grand Baie has an abundance of restaurants and discotheques. If you like to party to the sound of good music, you will find plenty of options to choose from here.

The north isn’t only about night life, however. It also boasts some of Mauritius’ best-loved sights, including the charming red-roofed church that overlooks the lagoon at Cap Malheureux.

The south reveals a dramatically different landscape from the rest of the island: one typified by high cliffs – in places – that are battered by waves. These are created where the protective barrier of coral reef that surrounds Mauritius falls away on the seabed, so leaving the coastline exposed to a punishing Indian Ocean.

But the south is not singularly about cliffs and rough waters. Further round the coastline, heading westwards are an array of beautiful beaches and top-rate hotels and resorts, in up-and-coming areas such as BelOmbre.

 

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